Cardiovascular Medicine

Edition 2024/02

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CVM

A New Surgical Section and More

Editorial
Peter Matt
Published on 27.03.2024
Peter Matt
The knowledge about heart surgery procedures is often outdated, for example, scars are described as being up to 50 cm long, the chest is cracked and much more. Cardiac surgery has evolved and is becoming less and less invasive. In addition, the outcomes are very good and the mid- to long-term results are often better than those of non-surgical therapies, with lower MACCE (major adverse cardiac and cardiovascular events) rates and improved survival. So, we have created a new section in Cardiovascular Medicine called "How we do it". In this section, various experts will present and explain their surgical or non-surgical techniques step by step.
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Peter Laurenz Dietrich, et. al.
Published on 27.03.2024
Peter Laurenz Dietrich
+2

Complete heart block (CHB) is a rare complication during left ventriculography. We present a case of transient CHB without ventricular escape rhythm in a patient with an incomplete trifascicular block.

Linn Ryberg, et. al.
Published on 27.03.2024
Linn Ryberg
+2

Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a fatal rare inherited cardiac channelopathy. Affected patients are susceptible to develop deadly ventricular arrythmias after physical or emotional stress. The typical arrhythmia presents as bidirectional and/or polymorphic ventricular tachycardias. To illustrate the clinical challenges in properly diagnosing this disease, we report two cases of CPVT together with a brief literature review.

Jessy Steve Masso-Bueso, et. al.
Published on 27.03.2024
Jessy Steve Masso-Bueso
+2

The development of prosthetic heart valves has allowed to drastically improve the quality of life and the life expectancy in patients who would otherwise have succumbed to the inevitable course of the disease. While prosthetic heart valves are invaluable resources in therapy, they are not devoid of possible complications, some inherent to the prosthesis itself (structural damage, thrombosis, etc.), others related to the patient (e.g., thrombophilia, non-adherence to medication). The case of a patient is presented whose findings are surprising and show that there is always an exception to the rule.